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Exercises to help a stuttering child

Family Education Eric Jones 189 views 0 comments

Stuttering is a common speech disorder that affects millions of children worldwide. It is characterized by disruptions in the normal flow of speech, such as repetition of sounds, words, or phrases, prolongation of sounds, and interruptions in speech. Children who stutter often experience frustration, anxiety, and low self-esteem as a result of their disorder.

One of the most effective ways to help a child who stutters is through speech therapy. Speech therapists can work with children to help them develop better speech fluency and communication skills. However, there are also a number of exercises that parents and caregivers can do at home to help a child who stutters.

One exercise that can be helpful is called the “easy onset” technique. This technique involves teaching the child to speak with a gentle, relaxed onset of sound, rather than with a sudden, tense onset. This can help to reduce the tension and struggle that often accompanies stuttering. To practice this technique, parents can have the child say a simple word or phrase, such as “the cat,” and then gently encourage them to begin the word with a relaxed onset of sound.

Another exercise that can be beneficial is called “stretching.” This involves having the child slow down their speech and prolong certain sounds or syllables. For example, the child may be asked to say the word “banana” slowly, emphasizing each syllable. This can help to reduce the tension and struggle that often accompanies stuttering, and can also help the child to become more aware of their speech patterns.

Another technique is called “breathing.” It is important for the child to learn how to breathe properly during speech. Children who stutter often hold their breath or take shallow breaths. This can make it harder for them to speak fluently. Parents can teach their child to take deep breaths before speaking and to exhale slowly while speaking. This can help to reduce the tension and struggle that often accompanies stuttering.

Additionally, parents can also teach their child “self-talk” techniques, which involve the child talking to themselves in a positive and encouraging way. This can help to boost the child’s confidence and reduce their anxiety and frustration. Parents can also encourage their child to participate in activities that they enjoy, such as sports, music, or art, as this can help to build their self-esteem and reduce the impact of their stuttering.

In conclusion, stuttering is a common speech disorder that can cause significant frustration and anxiety for children. However, with the help of speech therapy and exercises that can be done at home, children who stutter can learn to speak more fluently and confidently. Parents and caregivers can play a vital role in helping a child who stutters by providing support, encouragement, and by teaching them exercises that can help to reduce the tension and struggle that often accompanies stuttering.

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